Slow Show
NONE of the artworks shared on this blog belong to me. Credits which lead to the original source are always given and shouldn't be removed.

If you are the artist/ copyright owner and would like to have your work removed, please don’t hesitate to send me a message or email me at showslow@aol.com
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Washington DC cherry blossoms by Bill Holmes

Maurice Van EsTen sundowns before I was born

In his series ‘Master Plan’, designer Chad Wright is conflating a child’s sandcastle with architecture typifying postwar American suburbia. Chad grew up in a sprawling suburb of Southern California, he lived in a tract house (symbol of the American Dream) just like his neighbors. When he was young, him and his brother would build cities in the sand. Chad chose this artifacts from his childhood, combining them to create ‘Master Plan’. It is phase one of what will be a three-part series. He focuses on the mass-produced tract house, re-examining it as symbol for the model American Dream that seems to come to nothing, just like his installation | http://www.ignant.de/2013/07/25/master-plan/

Los Angeles by night ph. Tom Anderson | http://twistedsifter.com/2012/09/los-angeles-at-night-aerial-photo/

Pol Ledent | http://www.saatchiart.com/pledent


Scientists use harmless but eye-catching red dye to track the flow of meltwater.
Photo credit: Chris Linder

Hengki Koentjoro | http://hengki24.deviantart.com

Julian Castaneda aka Meetjulian | http://instagram.com/meetjulian

John Diavola, As far as I could get (1996/97) | http://www.divola.com | Seen @ LACMA

These photographs were made by pushing the self-timer button on my camera and running as fast as I could away from the camera. An exposure is made in 10 seconds. A selection of these prints was shown only once at the Hammer / UCLA Museum, Los Angeles.

Flightwave by Circa1983 | http://circa1983.ca/FlightwDve

Aisle seat? No thanks, I’ll take the window. This is how I roll when it comes to flying. Why pass up the opportunity to look down on earth from 35,000 feet? It’s an aerial photography mecca if you’re prepared.

A few tips if you’re planning to shoot from a plane:

1. I’ve found that lenses above 50mm tend to give the best results. This is because they focus past the airline window’s glass better than wider lenses and can isolate your shots better. I’ve even used my 70-200mm with great results for this reason.

2. Shoot at large apertures and fast shutter speeds. This is to keep the shots crisp despite the vibration and movement of the airplane. 

3. If you have the choice, book your flights so that you’re taking off or landing during a sunrise or sunset for optimal lighting and colour. Also, picking a seat near the front of the plane increases the likelihood that your view down to Earth isn’t obscured by the plane’s wing.

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers by Andre Ermolaev

Iceland is a wonderful country; I would even say that it is a true paradise for all the photo shooting-lovers. But what has become a real discovery for me is the bird’s eye view of the rivers flowing along the black volcanic sand.  It is an inexpressible combination of colors, lines, and patterns. The photo represents the mouth of the river falling into the ocean.

A little bit upstream there is a yellow-colored brook flowing into the river, but yellow currents fail to mix with the main water flow.  One can estimate the scale judging by the car tracks that are clearly seen on the black sand. This is just a river, just a volcano, just our planet.

- Andre Ermolaev (via)

Tchmo